Japan’s most vulnerable children

 
 

What challenges do they face?

Children’s care homes do an admirable job of providing a safe place and the basics for living, but most children still struggle with a host of unmet needs and problems such as:

1. Emotional and psychological damage 

2. Lack of parental guidance and role models

3. Severe academic deficits and little academic support

4. Inadequate support networks and safety nets as they enter adulthood

 

mnm_about-us_challenges.png

 

What are the common outcomes?

1. Homelessness

2. Employment in the sex industry

3. Limited or no education after high school

4. Placement of their own children in nursing homes

5. Unemployment or dead-end jobs, part of the working poor

6. Many have no parents to depend on, nowhere to live, and no academic record or qualifications for work.

7. It adds up to a terrible loss of human potential, and real social and economic costs for Japan.

8. When children leave their institution at the age of 18, they must be able to provide for themselves in every aspect of their lives, from housing to clothing and food, using money that they earn by working. However, because of the environments they were born and raised in, they don’t have the desire to work, and many lack the basic life and communication skills to be able to work. Many of these children will find themselves in the following situations:



*THE ILLUSTRATION AND DATA IS USED WITH PERMISSION FROM MIRAI NO MORI.


HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH JAPAN

in 2014, Human Rights Watch conducted an extensive look into children’s institutional care homes (orphanages) around Japan.

  1. full report here Without Dreams.

2. 1 MIN. summary of the REPORT here.

3. YOU CAN A WATCH AN INSIGHTFUL 14MIN. SUMMARY OF THE REPORT BELOW.